Memories, moments, timelesness

by Editor  Swapnil.

When cameras were first invented, they were used as medium and a way to store memories. People wanted a record of their life so that they could go through the prints and reminisce the happy times they once had. As time passed by, cameras became easier to handle and more affordable for masses.  More and more events were captured and stored right from the film days to the digital days.

From the past till now,  photography has probably seen the most changes compared to any Art form. From film to digital, from mirror sensors to mirror-less.  Each half a decade we have seen huge changes sweeping by.

 


“The bond between us...” by Charlaine Gerber


What certainly didn't change is the soul of the art form neither the reason why pictures are actually captured.

The memories, the moments, the timelessness … Everyone has its own reasons to capture “moments”. Pictures are often stories that the authors want to convey.
The story of the subject, the story of the moment, the story about how the photographer sees the scene. Therefore, it's right to say that we must not shoot what it is, but shoot how it feels.  Feeling is the real story of a picture.
 

"The State of Being Strong” by Mike Melnotte


In all the genres of photography, pictures that convey a story are the ones which are the most appreciated. The concept behind the picture is as important as the quality (exposure, image quality and beauty). All great photographers agree that the greatest images, even taken with cell phones, convey a story in the purest way.

 


"Sadness” by Edith Hoffman

 


“The choice to make” by Victoria Ivanova


Reading a picture can sometimes be like reading a whole if we have are digging deep enough. The most iconic and timeless are the images which have made a long-lasting impression on our minds.  Striking examples are photographs taking made during world war II.  Or the ones taken in Vietnam or Somalia showing malnutrition and the refugee crisis from the last years.

Sports photography and event photography are other genres where we can see lots of stories or timeless. The common thing behind all of them is again the story.

 


“Dialogue of two worlds” by MIKHAIL POTAPOV

 


“The Revolution” by Amin Roshan Afshar


As normal photographers we don’t have the access to special moments as they are considered reportage or journalistic kind of work. But even then, a simple landscape photo can portray a story about the land or the times it has been through. 

Wildlife photography also has myriad of opportunities to create stories, which can be easily assimilated to some feedback about the subject.

Portrait photography can open up a world about the person portrayed in one single image.

Stories always will keep people attracted to photography. Of the zillions of images posted daily on the social media, the special ones will be the ones which have a soul. 

Ansel Adams said: “Nothing can be worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept.”

It’s easy nowadays to be technically brilliant, but it much more difficult to convey true feelings and emotions behind pictures.

Enjoy this brilliant collection of timeless storytelling images from 1x photographers.

 


“Couple” by Izidor Gasperlin

 


“Rugby” by Cesar March

 


“Adu Panco” by Adhi Prayoga

 


“...tired... by rudolf wungkana

 


n/t by Paulo Medeiros

 


“Yellow glove” by Jan Scheunders

 


“rush hour” by swapnil.

 

 


“Biggles” by Warren Joyce

 


“Eye to Eye – Elk fight” by Jim Cumming

 


“The heart of a knight” by Victoria Ivanova

 


“War Fashion” by Tal Flint

 


“An Irish Airman Foresees His Death” by Michael Bilotta

 


“Fire I National Park of Cilento” by Antonio Grambone

 


“rice” by Ümmü Nisan Kandilcioglu

 


“Perisani village” by Julien Oncete

 


“Portrait of an old woman” by Julien Oncete

 

“The visit" by  Jose C. Lobato

 


“Children of Kathmandu” by Yvette Depaepe

 


“Soft is the heart of a child...” by Yvette Depaepe

 


“All for one” by Ekkachai Khemkum

 


“in my garden...” by Magdalena Russocka

 


“The wait” by Gus

 

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